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Cumulative Data
Osaka's Economic Competitiveness
Osaka Growth Strategy
What is the Integrated International Strategic Special Zone (tentative name)
 
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GDP Ranking
Approximately $712.1 billion (as of 2007).
Osaka has a global-scale economy that accounts for about 15% of Japan’s GDP.
Osaka has about 7% of Japan’s total population with approximately 8.84 million people (as of 2009).
And Osaka is home to 3.82 million households (as of 2009).
A Balanced Industrial Structure
Osaka’s advantage is its balanced industrial structure, consisting of its top four industries — chemicals (pharmaceuticals), general machinery, electronics (three categories: electrical appliances, telecommunication equipment, and electronic components and devices), and metal products — as well as its substantial manufacturing support industries. (Source: 2007 Industry Statistics) Osaka is in fourth place nationwide, behind Tokyo, in value of manufactured goods shipped at ¥18.158 trillion (as of 2008).
The value of annual commercial sales for 2007 was ¥61.6602 trillion, second only to Tokyo. Osaka is also second only to Tokyo in number of businesses and number of employees.
Applications for patents, utility designs, industrial designs, and trademarks numbered about 71,000 in 2008, roughly twice as many as that of Aichi Prefecture.
120 research laboratories were established in the Kansai region in 2009, second only to the Kanto region's 262.
●Osaka Port and Kobe Port shipped about ¥1.7 trillion worth of electronic devices, including devices with electronic circuitry as well as semiconductor components, greatly exceeding the value shipped by Tokyo Port and Yokohama Port.
●If you look at the volume of domestic cargo traded in 2007, Osaka Port and Sakai-Senboku Port shipped about 106,321 thousand tons in total, greatly exceeding the volume shipped by Nagoya Port and matching the total volume shipped by Tokyo Port and Chiba Port combined.
●Industrial Property
(Setting 1980 to an index value of 100) A comparison of Japan's three metropolitan areas — Osaka, Tokyo, and Nagoya — shows that in 2009, Osaka's industrial land prices were at 84.7, a much larger decline than those of the other two metropolises.
●Commercial Property
(Setting 1980 to an index value of 100) A comparison of Japan's three metropolitan areas — Osaka, Tokyo, and Nagoya — shows that in 2009, Osaka's commercial land prices were at 71.8, a much larger decline than those of the other two metropolises.
●Residential Property
(Setting 1980 to an index value of 100) A comparison of Japan's three metropolitan areas — Osaka, Tokyo, and Nagoya — shows that in 2009, Osaka's commercial land prices had gone up 119.1 from price levels 30 years earlier, which is a smaller increase than those of the other two metropolises.
The numbers of universities in the Kansai, Kanto and Chubu regions in 2009 were as follows: Kansai 235, Kanto 364, and Chubu 151 — showing the Kansai region to be second only to the Kanto region.
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